Wimpole Hall
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Introduction

The Entrance Hall and the former Ante-Chapel started as two separate rooms, but were opened into this airy and welcoming space by Henry Kendall in the 1840s. This included the installation of the pillars with their Ionic capitals, which also lead into the Inner Hall.

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Photograph

This photograph depicts Captain and Mrs George Bambridge at the foot of the front steps of Wimpole Hall in the late 1930s. Note that the wrought iron work, which is no longer present, was surrendered for the war-effort.

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A Wolf

by John Wootton (c1682 – 1764)

This animal has been identified as a European wolf. As a breed, these became extinct in 1939. The unusual – or unconvincing – pose is thought to be because the painting was executed after the animal had died.
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Floor

This highly decorated floor of encaustic tiles by Maw & Co, Shropshire, incorporates the monogram and motto of the Earls of Hardwicke: ‘Nec cupias nec metuas’ – ‘(to have) neither desire nor fear’. The threshold to the former Ante-Chapel bears the Latin greeting: ‘Salve!’ – ‘Welcome’. Encaustic tiles carry their colour all the way through, whereas in other types the colour is applied as a glaze to the top surface, which, in time, will wear away.

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